Engineering Students Share Their Research on Capitol Hill During Annual Event

February 10th, 2022

News Release — February 10, 2022 — Six Utah State University College of Engineering students presented their research in Salt Lake City on Tuesday as part of the annual Research on Capitol Hill event.

Eric Larsen, a mechanical and aerospace engineering student, discusses his poster with USU President Noelle Cockett.

Eric Larsen, a mechanical and aerospace engineering student, discusses his poster with USU President Noelle Cockett.

Students from USU and the University of Utah displayed their work in the capitol’s rotunda, which marked a return to holding the event in person after last year’s virtual presentations.

Research on Capitol Hill provides students a unique opportunity to share their work with Utah lawmakers. Eric Larsen, a mechanical and aerospace engineering student, presented research on better understanding the flow between the north and south arms of the Great Salt Lake.

Preserving the lake is an important issue for many lawmakers this legislative session and Larsen was excited to share his research about the lake with them.

“I’ve had multiple legislators come up and talk to me and say ‘What can I know more about the Great Salt Lake?’” Larsen said. “And it’s been great to be able to talk with them and to try and help inform them to the best of my ability.”

Biological Engineering student Emily Brothersen shares her poster with Rep. Joe Briscoe during the Research on Capitol Hill event.

Biological Engineering student Emily Brothersen shares her poster with Rep. Joe Briscoe during the Research on Capitol Hill event.

As a researcher, Larsen said he has been taught the importance of sharing the information he gains with decision-makers. Presenting on capitol hill provided him the chance to do this.

“Here is exactly where that can happen,” Larsen said. “We are with the people who can make those changes and can help preserve the Great Salt Lake for years to come.”

Biological engineering student Emily Brothersen also presented her work on Tuesday and said events like this help her improve how she communicates her research.

“It’s a really cool experience just to be able to see the impact that research can have,” she said. “It’s not just sitting in a lab doing some tests. It has a broader impact that can make a difference.”

Kolton Hauck, Isaac Hilton, Trace Taylor, and Tyler Wallentine also participated in Research on Capitol Hill. All the Utah State presentations featured at the event can be found here.

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Writer: Matilyn Mortensen, matilyn.mortensen@usu.edu, 435-797-7512

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