2016 REU Students
(June 06 - August 14, 2016)
the best eight out of fourty nine applicants

Megan Rose

Megan Rose Cleary

Jehremy Sung

Jehremy Sung Cho Felig

Rosamaria Diaz

Rosamaria Diaz

Matthew Eric

Matthew Eric D'Angelo

Elyse Danielle

Elyse Danielle Hill

Carlos Z

Carlos Z Pereyra

Mikayla Renee

Mikayla Renee Bilskie

Tyler Reed

Tyler Reed Milliken

Students' Origin

2016 REU Students' Origin

Activities in a Glimpse

On a typical day, students were either reading articles, having a discussion, or working on their research. At the end of the week, students were required to fill weekly reflection and attend the debriefing session. Some exceptions are listed bellow. Additionally, each Research Team has their own schedule.
 

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Jun 06

Students' Check In and First Meeting

Filling up paper works and have a glimpse of the REU activities and research projects.

Campus and Office Tour

Andreas and Michael (graduate mentors) were there to help you getting familar with USU Logan-campus and office area.

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Jun 07

First Research Group Meeting

Meeting of the research group to make plan for the rest of the weeks.

Seminar: Self-Regulated Learning: What is it?

Attend Dr. Lawanto's (faculty mentor) presentation and ask a lot of questions.

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Jun 08

Seminar: A Brief Introduction to Qualitative Methods

Attend Dr. Goodridge's (faculty mentor) presentation and ask a lot of questions.

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Jun 09

Everything about Institutional Review Board (IRB)

Institutional Review Board (IRB) online training and certification.

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Jun 14

Seminar: Curriculum and Research: Developing an Educational Research Question

Attend Dr. Fang's (faculty mentor) presentation and ask a lot of questions.

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Jun 17

Seminar: Educational Data Analysis with SPSS

Attend Dr. Fang's (faculty mentor) presentation and ask a lot of questions.

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Jun 21

Seminar: Responsible Research

Attend Ben Call's (Graduate Mentor) presentation and ask a lot of questions.

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Jul 07

Formative Assessment

Formative assessment with Dr. Lubke and Michael (graduate mentor).

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Aug 04

Research Group Presentation

Tell me everything: your research approaches/results; what you learned.

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Aug 05

Summative Assessment

Summative assessment with Dr. Lubke and Michael (graduate mentor).

REU Journey Map Presentation and Farewell Dinner

It is time to say good bye!

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Aug 14

Final Research Report

Send your final report (word format) by email to your faculty mentor.

Mentors and Staff

Oenardi Lawanto

Oenardi Lawanto, PhD

Faculty Mentor

olawanto@usu.edu

Ning Fang

Ning Fang, PhD

Faculty Mentor

ning.fang@usu.edu

Wade Goodridge

Wade Goodridge, PhD

Faculty Mentor

wade.goodridge@usu.edu

Andreas Febrian

Andreas Febrian

Graduate Mentor

Michael Liu

Gang (Michael) Liu, PhD

Graduate Mentor

Ben Call

Ben Call

Graduate Mentor

Sarah Bell

Sarah Bell

Graduate Mentor

Kay Rose

Kay Rose

Senior Staff Assistant (Retired)

Shane Bullock

Shane Bullock

Systems Administrator / Lab Manager

shane.bullock@usu.edu

Research Projects

Undergradute experience in Engineering Education Research

#1 - Experience of Undergraduate Student in Engineering Education Research

Undergraduate research has received growing attention in recent years due to its positive impact in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education, such as increasing students' understanding, confidence, awareness, and interest of STEM subjects. To foster and promote undergraduate research, the National Science Foundation of the U.S. has established a Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. The REU Site program aims to motivate and retain talented undergraduates in STEM careers, particularly careers in teaching and STEM education research. This research will provide REU students authentic experience conducting engineering education research and a deeper understanding of undergraduate student's perception about education research. Sixteen undergraduate students from various institutions participated in the study. The goal of this research is to understand how student's understanding about education research change and what factor(s) that may contribute to that change. Qualitative data were collected from numerous sources such as participating students' self-report weekly reflection, pre- & post- survey, and pre- & post- focus group interviews. The project will involve transcribing, coding, and analyzing the qualitative data.

Researcher

  • Megan Rose Cleary (Keene State College)
  • Jehremy Sung Cho Felig (Montana State University Billings)
  • Andreas Febrian (Graduate Mentor)
  • Oenardi Lawanto, PhD (Faculty Mentor)

Activities

  • Reading background literature
  • Video transcribing
  • Thematic coding
  • Coding categorization
  • Presenting research process and results
Self-regulated learning of computer science

#2 - Self-Regulated Learning of Computer Science Students While Engaged in Programming Design

In this modern age, computers and smart devices are pervasive. It has been used to improve the quality of, for example, telecommunication, transportation, medical, and security services. Consequently, employers expect the next generation of workers to have some basic knowledge in applying these technological advancement to solve their problems. In other words, they are expected to have some computer science (CS) skills. Being aware of the importance of CS skills in the future, the states of Florida, Chicago, Utah, and California decided to incorporate CS-base courses in their respective K-12 curriculum through what commonly known as computational thinking. On the other hand, research in education have shown that students with better self-regulated learning (SRL) skills will excel in academic learning and problem solving compared to their counterparts. However, little has been known about students' SRL in programming design, one of the core activities in CS. This study aims to bridge that gap by assessing and describing CS students' SRL while they engaged in programming tasks. A qualitative case study will be conducted to three-to-four CS students which will be recruited from the CS department at Utah State University using the criterion sampling method. The participants will be asked to spend 2.5 hours to answer two programming questions, which will be audio and video recorded. Framed in Butler and Cartier's SRL model, the attribute, process, in-vivo, and pattern coding approaches will be applied to the transcribed data. Each participant will receive $25 and a personalized SRL profile as tokens of appreciation. A member checking activity will be conducted at the end of the data analysis process to validate research findings.

Researcher

  • Rosamaria Diaz (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)
  • Matthew Eric D'Angelo (UMass Lowell)
  • Andreas Febrian (Graduate Mentor)
  • Oenardi Lawanto, PhD (Faculty Mentor)

Activities

  • Reading background literature
  • Refining data collection instrument
  • Collecting data
  • Video transcribing
  • Thematic coding
  • Coding categorization
  • Presenting research process and results
Effects of self-regulation on coceptual understanding in engineering dynamics

#3 - Effects of Students' Self-regulation on Their Conceptual Understanding in Engineering Dynamics

The study aims to determine if there exists a correlation between undergraduate engineering students' self-regulated learning (SRL) and conceptual change in Engineering Dynamics. The project applies a qualitative research method to investigate the conceptual understanding among student participants, and a quantitative statistic data analysis to describe the most common misconceptions and the interaction between factors influenced the holistic performance of participants. The qualitative data is collected through interview, questionnaires, observation, and transcription coding analysis. Participants took part in pre- and posttests developed to address the most common misconceptions among undergraduate engineering students. This project aims to determine the correlation that might exist between SRL and conceptual change, which benefits first and second year curricular development of engineering disciplines.

Researcher

  • Elyse Danielle Hill (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
  • Carlos Z Pereyra (California State University, Sacramento)
  • Gang (Michael) Liu, PhD (Graduate Mentor)
  • Ning Fang, PhD (Faculty Mentor)

Activities

  • Reading background literature
  • Thematic coding
  • Coding categorization
  • Presenting research process and results
Intro Entrepreneural Education to Engineering Technical Writing course through student consultants

#4 - Introducing Entrepreneurial Education to an Engineering Technical Writing Course through Student Consultants

This study aims to discover a correlation between the introduction of the NERCM (Needs, Experience, Resources, Customers, Model) entrepreneurial instruction delivered to sophomore and junior engineering students during a technical writing course. Instruction was delivered by student consultants from the Entrepreneurship Club to engineering students as an enhancement to existing technical writing curriculum. This study is a mixed method study utilizing quantitative and qualitative research methods to investigate entrepreneurial intent, mindset, and creativity. Descriptive statistics will be used to describe the population and collected data, while analysis for correlation will be conducted with multiple linear regression in SPSS. Qualitative analysis will also be conducted on post interview questions delivered to participants to provide preliminary data on the interventions reception and effectiveness. The study hopes to discover links that may exist between entrepreneurial interventions and entrepreneurial intent through minimal curriculum enhancements.

Researcher

  • Mikayla Renee Bilskie (University of Florida)
  • Tyler Reed Milliken (University of Tennessee)
  • Ben Call (Graduate Mentor)
  • Sarah Bell (Graduate Mentor)
  • Wade Goodridge, PhD (Faculty Mentor)

Activities

  • Reading background literature
  • Creativity assessment analysis
  • Quantitative data analysis
  • Statistical tests for significance
  • Outlier analysis
  • Video transcribing
  • Presenting research process and results

Testimonies

Megan Rose Cleary

Megan Rose Cleary (Keene State College)

"...it [the meeting with professors] really provided an in depth discussion to our research and I learned different ways to categorize, or code, my data. "

Jehremy Sung Cho Felig (Montana State University Billings)

We need an understanding of how students can build knowledge most effectively. How does prior knowledge affect learning? What tools can be implemented in the classroom to increase productivity and curiosity? Answers to such questions lies within this research.

Jehremy Sung Cho Felig
Rosamaria Diaz

Rosamaria Diaz (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)

"..I enjoy facilitating verbal protocol. It is great to listen to participant talk aloud as they are solving problems because you get insight on what they are thinking and what their mental processes are. I like learning about how differently people approach problems, but also going back and finding similarities in their approaches."

Matthew Eric D'Angelo (UMass Lowell)

I learned that I get different benefits from different kinds of work. Working with my partner on code combining taught me how to concede when convinced and how to stick up for what I strongly believe. This was all about compromise and teamwork, and involved keeping our motivation and spirits up. Meeting with my advisor, who knows more, and the other REU student, who had very different research experiences, was about hearing a lot of perspectives, and asking questions, getting answers and making decision. Working alone taught me how to use flexibility in my task descriptions to put my own spin on my work and do it in a way I believe makes meaningful results.

Matthew Eric D'Angelo

Elyse Danielle Hill (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)

"...I learned about conceptual understanding, conceptual change, and the integration of those into SRL. As I read the [research] articles, I gained a greater understanding of the way I personally organize knowledge in my mind (which agrees mostly with the knowledge-in-pieces view). In addition, reading these articles has helped me to identify and give vocabulary to experiences I've had in school that I've never had words to express before."

Elyse Danielle Hill

Carlos Z Pereyra (California State University, Sacramento)

First [valuable experience is] traveling to a place I've never been to, visiting MOAB and the Grand Tetons, and learning about SRL. My interest in becoming a better professor than my own professors has driven me to see how to incorporate SRL into instruction in the future.

Carlos Z Pereyra
Mikayla Renee Bilskie

Mikayla Renee Bilskie (University of Florida)

One of the valuable experiences I had from this REU program was learning the process of research including grading surveys, collaborating with my research partner, analyzing data, and presenting the information. I also feel that the experience of learning how to use a statistical program for data analysis and how to interpret the statistical results in terms of the research project will benefit me in my professional career after college. My favorite experience was having the opportunity to meet seven people from different parts of the country and getting to bond with them outside of the research project. I had a lot of fun exploring Utah and the surrounding states with such a diverse and great group of people.

Tyler Reed Milliken (University of Tennessee)

"I learned that as an engineer, I can become too comfortable with quantitative data and focus too much on numbers. I see that it can fun to stretch your thinking, and I hope this REU continues to allow me to focus on qualitative data."

Tyler Reed Milliken