The Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) Program Assessment

Ph.D. in Engineering Education

Program Description

The Doctorate of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Engineering Education program is a 42-credit program offered by Department of Engineering Education. The program is a face-to-face program (rather than an online program) and is delivered on the Logan campus of Utah State University.

The Ph.D. program prepares students to be engineering instructors, engineering education researchers and specialists. The program requires students must, among others,

  1. Complete minimum 42-credit course requirements, including 16-credit Engineering Education Core courses, 9-credit Research Theory Core courses, minimum 5-credit Technical Elective courses, and minimum 12-credit Ph.D. Dissertation research.
  2. Complete Qualifying Examination.
  3. Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 during the graduate study.

Learning Objectives

To successfully complete the requirements of the Doctorate of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Engineering Education program, students must meet the following key learning objectives:

LO1: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

LO2: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) major issues related to human learning including the nature of expertise, knowledge organization and deployment, transfer of learning, and assessment of cognitive skills

LO3: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) the historical, philosophical, and psychological foundations of engineering education as the field has evolved within academic, social, political, and economic contexts

LO4: Apply (e.g., use, implement) the appropriate skills necessary to organize and prepare competitive grant proposals

LO5: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) basic principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

LO6: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) various methods to measure and evaluate student achievement within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains

LO7: Create (e.g., design, develop, formulate) learning objectives and assessments relevant to those learning objectives

LO8: Apply (e.g., use, implement, interpret) principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

LO9: Apply (e.g., use, implement, interpret) regulations, policies, statues, ethical issues, and guidelines that govern the conduct of research with human subjects

Assessment Plan

Assessment Plan: Ph.D. in Engineering Education

After careful considerations and discussions, we have identified two most important milestones that all students in our Ph.D. in Engineering Education program are required to complete. The first milestone is the Qualifying Examination (QE). The second milestone is the Dissertation Research Project (DRP).

Qualifying Examination (QE)

The purpose of the Qualifying Examination is to assess the extent to which students have achieved mastery of knowledge gained from the core courses in the Ph.D. in Engineering Education curriculum and to gauge student readiness for subsequent doctoral study in engineering education. The Qualifying Examination consists of two sections administered over two days. Students are given four hours to complete each section. Exam on Day 1 covers knowledge gained from four core courses in the Ph.D. in Engineering Education curriculum: EED 6090, 6150, 7010, and 7230. The Exam on Day 2 covers knowledge gained from another four core courses: EDUC/PSY 6570, EED 7460, EED 7040, and STAT 5200 (or EDUC/PSY 6600).

Each section includes a set of exam problems. Each exam problem is associated with at least one learning objective (LO1 through LO7). An Exam Review Committee, which consists of the student’s Faculty Advisor (Major Professor) and other faculty members in the Department, read and review student responses to each exam problem to determine the level of evidence that the student meets the learning objectives. The level of evidence is ranked from 1 to 5, where 1 indicates the lowest level of evidence and 5 the highest level of evidence.

Each committee member assesses student responses to exam problems using the following rubric:

Learning Objectives (LO)

Level of Evidence Students Meet Each Learning Objective

LO1: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO2: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) major issues related to human learning including the nature of expertise, knowledge organization and deployment, transfer of learning, and assessment of cognitive skills

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO3: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) the historical, philosophical, and psychological foundations of engineering education as the field has evolved within academic, social, political, and economic contexts

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO4: Apply (e.g., use, implement) the appropriate skills necessary to organize and prepare competitive grant proposals

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO5: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) basic principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO6: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) various methods to measure and evaluate student achievement within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO7: Create (e.g., design, develop, formulate) learning objectives and assessments relevant to those learning objectives

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

The average score (i.e., the level of evidence) is calculated based on all scores provided by all committee members on each learning objective.

Dissertation Research Project (DRP)

All students in our Ph.D. in Engineering Education program are required to complete a 12-credit Dissertation Research Project that leads to a Ph.D. Dissertation. A Ph.D. Dissertation typically consists of six chapters, including Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Review of Literature, Chapter 3 Research Methodology/Design, Chapter 4 Results, Chapter 5 Discussions, and Chapter 6 Conclusions/Significance/Implications.

Each chapter in the Ph.D. Dissertation is associated with at least one learning objective (LO1, LO8, and LO9). The student’s Supervisory Committee, which consists of the student’s Faculty Advisor and four other faculty members inside and outside the Department, read and review the student’s Dissertation to determine the level of evidence that the student meets the learning objectives. The level of evidence is ranked from 1 to 5, where 1 indicates the lowest level of evidence and 5 the highest level of evidence.

Each committee member assesses each chapter of the student’s Ph.D. Dissertation using the following rubric:

Learning Objectives (LO)

Level of Evidence Students Meet Each Learning Objective

LO1: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO8: Apply (in this context: use) principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO9: Apply (e.g., use, implement, interpret) regulations, policies, statues, ethical issues, and guidelines that govern the conduct of research with human subjects

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

The average score (i.e., the level of evidence) is calculated based on all scores provided by all committee members on each learning objective.

Outcomes Data

Academic Year 2020-2021

Number of students who completed Qualifying Exam: 5

Learning Objectives (LO)

Average Score (on a scale of 1-5 with 1 for a low level of evidence and 5 for a high level of evidence)

LO1: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

4.2

LO2: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) major issues related to human learning including the nature of expertise, knowledge organization and deployment, transfer of learning, and assessment of cognitive skills

4.2

LO3: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) the historical, philosophical, and psychological foundations of engineering education as the field has evolved within academic, social, political, and economic contexts

4.3

LO4: Apply (e.g., use, implement) the appropriate skills necessary to organize and prepare competitive grant proposals

4.3

LO5: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) basic principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

4.1

LO6: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) various methods to measure and evaluate student achievement within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains

4.4

LO7: Create (e.g., design, develop, formulate) learning objectives and assessments relevant to those learning objectives

4.1

Number of students who completed Doctoral Research Project: 3

Learning Objectives (LO)

Average Score (on a scale of 1-5 with 1 for a low level of evidence and 5 for a high level of evidence)

LO1: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

4.3

LO8: Apply (in this context: use) principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

4.2

LO9: Apply (e.g., use, implement, interpret) regulations, policies, statues, ethical issues, and guidelines that govern the conduct of research with human subjects

4.4

Academic Year 2019-2020

Number of students who completed Qualifying Exam: 3

Learning Objectives (LO)

Average Score (on a scale of 1-5 with 1 for a low level of evidence and 5 for a high level of evidence)

LO1: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

4.3

LO2: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) major issues related to human learning including the nature of expertise, knowledge organization and deployment, transfer of learning, and assessment of cognitive skills

4.7

LO3: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) the historical, philosophical, and psychological foundations of engineering education as the field has evolved within academic, social, political, and economic contexts

4.3

LO4: Apply (e.g., use, implement) the appropriate skills necessary to organize and prepare competitive grant proposals

4.7

LO5: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) basic principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

4.2

LO6: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) various methods to measure and evaluate student achievement within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains

4.3

LO7: Create (e.g., design, develop, formulate) learning objectives and assessments relevant to those learning objectives

4.7

Data-Based Decisions

Academic Year 2020-2021

Five students completed Qualifying Exam with the average score above 4.0 for each learning objective. Three students completed Doctoral Research Project with the average score above 4.0 for each learning objective. All these students have succeeded in their Qualifying Exam and/or Doctoral Research Project.

On a scale of 1-5, 1 stands for the lowest level of evidence and 5 for the highest level of evidence that a student meets the learning objectives. Therefore, no major changes are needed for the future assessment plan.

Academic Year 2019-2020

Three students completed Qualifying Exam with the average score above 4.0 for each learning objective. They have succeeded in their Qualifying Exam.

On a scale of 1-5, 1 stands for the lowest level of evidence and 5 for the highest level of evidence that a student meets the learning objectives. Therefore, no major changes are needed for the future assessment plan.

M.S. in Engineering Education

Program Description

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Engineering Education program is a 30-credit program offered by Department of Engineering Education in 2021. The program is a face-to-face program (rather than an online program) and is delivered on the Logan campus of Utah State University.

The M.S. program prepares students to be engineering instructors, engineering education researchers and specialists. The program offers Plan A (thesis) and Plan B (research project) options. Plan A of the program requires students must, among others,

  1. Complete minimum 30-credit course requirements, including 6-credit Engineering Education Core courses, 3-credit Research Theory Core courses, minimum 12-credit Technical Elective courses, and minimum 6-credit Master’s Thesis research.
  2. Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 during the graduate study.

Plan B of the program requires students must, among others,

  1. Complete minimum 30-credit course requirements, including 6-credit Engineering Education Core courses, 3-credit Research Theory Core courses, minimum 15-credit Technical Elective courses, and minimum 3-credit research project.
  2. Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 during the graduate study.

Learning Objectives

To successfully complete the requirements of the Master of Science (M.S.) in Engineering Education program, students must meet the following key learning objectives:

LO1_MS: Create (e.g., design, develop, formulate) learning objectives and assessments relevant to those learning objectives

LO2_MS: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) various methods to measure and evaluate student achievement within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains

LO3_MS: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

LO4_MS: Apply (e.g., use, implement, interpret) principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

LO5_MS: Apply (e.g., use, implement, interpret) regulations, policies, statues, ethical issues, and guidelines that govern the conduct of research with human subjects

Assessment Plan

Assessment Plan: M.S. in Engineering Education

After careful considerations and discussions, we have identified two critical core courses and the most important milestone that all students in our M.S. in Engineering Education program are required to complete. The two critical core courses include EED 6090 and EED 6150. The most important milestone is the Master’s Thesis Research (for Plan A students) or Master’s Research Project (for Plan B students).

EED 6090 Developing an Engineering Education Curriculum

This course reviews the basic principles and practices of curriculum development required for an engineering education curriculum. The emphasis of this course is placed on the integration of research findings and best practices into course design. This course directly addresses the following learning objective of the M.S. program:

LO1_MS: Create (e.g., design, develop, formulate) learning objectives and assessments relevant to those learning objectives

The faculty instructor who teaches EED 6090 provides a comprehensive assessment of student learning using a variety of method, such as homework assignments and exams. At the end of the course, each Master’s student is assigned a score of 1-5 representing the level of evidence that the student meets the above learning objective. The level of evidence is ranked from 1 to 5, where 1 indicates the lowest level of evidence and 5 the highest level of evidence.

EED 6150 Teaching, Learning & Assessment in Engineering Education

This course provides an overview of the various methods used to measure and evaluate student achievement within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains are covered. The principles of learning and assessment as it is applied to Engineering Education are also reviewed. This course directly addresses the following learning objective of the M.S. program:

LO2_MS: Understand (e.g., identify, classify, describe, explain) various methods to measure and evaluate student achievement within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains

The faculty instructor who teaches EED 6150 provides a comprehensive assessment of student learning using a variety of method, such as homework assignments and exams. At the end of the course, each Master’s student is assigned a score of 1-5 representing the level of evidence that the student meets the above learning objective. The level of evidence is ranked from 1 to 5, where 1 indicates the lowest level of evidence and 5 the highest level of evidence.

Master’s Thesis Research (for Plan A students) and Master’s Research Project (for Plan B students)

All students in our M.S. in Engineering Education (Plan A) program are required to complete a 6-credit Master’s Thesis Research that leads to a M.S. Thesis. All students in our M.S. in Engineering Education (Plan B) program are required to complete a 3-credit Master’s Research Project that leads to a Research Project Report. The Thesis and the Report typically consists of six chapters, including Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Review of Literature, Chapter 3 Research Methodology/Design, Chapter 4 Results, Chapter 5 Discussions, and Chapter 6 Conclusions/Significance/Implications.

Each chapter in the M.S. Thesis or Research Project Report is associated with at least one learning objective (LO3_MS, LO4_MS, and LO5_MS). The student’s Supervisory Committee, which consists of the student’s Major Professor and two other faculty members inside the Department, read and review the student’s Thesis or Research Project Report to determine the level of evidence that the student meets the learning objectives. The level of evidence is ranked from 1 to 5, where 1 indicates the lowest level of evidence and 5 the highest level of evidence.

Each committee member assesses each chapter of the student’s Ph.D. Dissertation using the following rubric:

Learning Objectives (LO)

Level of Evidence Students Meet Each Learning Objective

LO3_MS: Synthesize issues (e.g., theories, ideas, research findings, conclusions, and recommendations) in writing

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO4_MS: Apply (in this context: use) principles and practices of research methodologies typically used in engineering education research

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

LO5_MS: Apply (e.g., use, implement, interpret) regulations, policies, statues, ethical issues, and guidelines that govern the conduct of research with human subjects

Low evidence High evidence

1 2 3 4 5

The average score (i.e., the level of evidence) is calculated based on all scores provided by all committee members on each learning objective.

Outcomes Data

This M.S. program was just established in July 2021. Outcomes data will be provided when available.

Data-Based Decisions

This M.S. program was just established in July 2021. Data-based decisions will be provided when available.